Demand Peripherals     Robotics and Automation Made Easy

Interface Cards and Accessories

 

Interface Cards are circuit boards that contain the electronics needed to tie a peripheral to your application hardware. Accessories are circuit boards or other hardware that make building your application hardware easier. Accessories include power distribution cards, mounting hardware, and a USB hub.

 

QUICK INDEX:
   User Interface Cards
   Motion Control Cards
   General Purpose I/O Cards
   Accessories
   Card Dimensions
   Card Electrical Interface

 

Controller Cards

Baseboard: The FPGA-based Baseboard gives you the ability to run nine different peripherals simultaneously. Every peripheral has Linux support making it easy to build a complete robotic or automation system. Click here for more information.

 

User Interface

Audio Amplifier Card : The Audio Amplifier Card uses a Maxim MAX9700B one Watt monaural, Class-D audio amplifier chip. The card has rugged screw terminals for power and has a 3.5 MM jack for external input. An eight pin connector provides a way to connect to an FPGA for simple tone generation. Click here for more information.

IR Receiver/transmitter The IR Input/Output card provides consumer IR input and output ot your robot or automation. The card requires one slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "irio" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and command line control of the card. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for switch transitions. Click here for more information.

 

Six Digit LCD Display The six digit LCD display provides a large, easy to read, display of six seven-segment digits. The card requires on slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "lcd6" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and command line control of the both the digits and even the individual segments on the display. Click here for more information.

 

Keyfob RF Receiver The keyfob receiver card receives and decodes most 315 MHz and 434 MHz remote controls. One model has an a built-in antenna for 315 MHz and the other model has an SMA connector for either 315 or 434 MHz. The card requires one slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "rfob" FPGA peripheral. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for switch transitions. Click here for more information.

 

Rotary Encoder The Rotary Encoder Card provides a continuous rotation encoder with built-in push button and an indicator LED. The card requires an FPGA card slot and must be paired with the "roten" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and a command line interface to the card. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for switch transitions. Click here for more information.

 

Quad Switch Card The Quad Switch Card provides four attractive slide switches for input to your robot or automation. The card works without an FPGA slot but is normally paired to the "in4" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and a command line interface to the switch state. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for switch transitions. Click here for more information.

 

Text Interface Card The Text Interface Card provides several of the most common user interface elements. Included are an interface to text display, a piezo beeper, a rotary encoder with push button, an interface to a 4x5 keypad, and two LEDs. The card requires one slot on the FPGA card and is paired with the "tif" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and a command line interface. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for switch transitions. Click here for more information.

 

Quad Slide Pot The Quad Slide Potentiometer Card provides four slide pots with a 10 bit ADC on each pot. The tip of each pot is illuminated with a red LED making the pots easy to see in dim lighting. The card requires one slot on the FPGA card and is paired with the "slider4" FPGA peripheral. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for switch transitions. Click here for more information.

 

Motion Control

Dual 7-amp H-bridge The Dual 7 Amp h-Bridge Card supports a continuous current of 7 Amps and a peak current of 12. Each H-Bridge uses two control lines and has forward, reverse, brake, and coast modes of operation. The Dual H-Bridge does not need the FPGA but is often paired with either the dual DC motor controller (dc2) peripheral or the bipolar stepper motor controller (bstep) peripheral. Click here for more information.

 

Quad Open Drain Driver The Quad Open Drain Driver Card provides four open-drain N-FETs. Combined current on all FETs is limited to 15 Amps. The open drain driver does not need the FPGA but is often paired with either the "out4" peripheral or the unipolar stepper motor controller ("ustep") FPGA peripheral. Click here for more information.

 

Quad 10 Amp Relay Card : The Quad 10 Amp Relay Card has four individually controlled Class B SPDT relays. Each relay has a discrete FET driver and a back EMF diode. The coil voltage is five volts, making the card compatible with the rest of your system. Click here for more information.

 

Dual Digital Pot The Quad Digital Potentiometer uses the MCP4251 to provide four computer controlled 10 KOhm potentiometers with 257 steps. Other values are available on request. The card uses one slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "qpot" FPGA peripheral. Click here for more information.

 

Input/Output

Quad GPIO The Quad General Purpose Input/Output Card provides four connections to the FPGA. The output is 3.3 volts and the input can range between 3.3 and 5 volts. This card is often paired with the "gpio4", "in4", or the "out4" FPGA peripherals. The GPIO4 card is also used with the dual quadrature decoder ("quad2"), the quad event counter ("count4"), the quad PWM input ("pwmin4"), the quad PWM output ("pwmout4"), the quad Ping sensor interface ("ping4"), and the quad servo controller ("servo4") FPGA peripherals. Click here for more information.

 

Octal 12-bit ADC The Octal 12 Analog-to-Digital Converter Card uses the Microchip MCP3304 to provide eight channels of analog input. The card uses one slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "adc12" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and a command line interface to the card. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for switch transitions. Click here for more information.

 

9DOF IMU The Nine Degree-of-Freedom Inertia Measurement Unit has an LSM9DS0 chip which contain the 9DOF IMU and a temperature sensor. The card requires one slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "imu10" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and command line control of the card. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for readings. Click here for more information.

 

Octal SRF04 Interface The Octal Ultrasonic Distance Interface Card drives up to eight SRF04 distance sensors. The card requires one slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "us8" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and command line control of the card. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for readings. Click here for more information.

 

Generic I2C The Generic I2C Interface Card provides an easy way to connect almost any I2C device to your robot or automation. The card requires a slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "ei2c" FPGA peripheral. Click here for more information.

 

Generic SPI The Generic SPI Interface Card provides an easy way to connect almost any SPI device to your robot or automation. The card requires a slot on the FPGA card and must be paired with the "espi" FPGA peripheral. Linux support includes both TCP and a command line interface. Click here for more information.

 

USB 2.0 Hub: The four port USB 2.0 HUB4 card has mounting holes for secure placement, per-port power control, a reliable screw terminal for input power, and the ability to pass power up to the host if needed. Click here for more information.

 

Real Time Clock The Real-Time Clock Card uses a PCF2123 RTC chip and coin cell to give up to a year of battery backed date and time. The PCF2123 has an alarm output that you can configure to go low at a set time. The alarm output can control the remote input on either of the Power Distribution Cards. Click here for more information.

 

Slot Expander The Octal Slot Expansion Card uses one slot of the FPGA card to control up to eight binary output cards. For example, a single SE8 card can control eight quad relay cards. Click here for more information.

 

Octal Input/Output The Octal Input/Output Card provides eight binary outputs and eight binary inputs. Linux support includes both TCP and command line control of the card. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for input transitions. Click here for more information.

 

32 Channel Input The 32 Channel Binary Input Card provides 32 bits of 5 Volt tolerent input. The inputs are on pin 1 of a 3-pin header. The voltages at pins 2 and 3 are user selectable via screw terminals. Linux support includes both TCP and command line control of the card. Input from the card is event driven so your code does not need to poll for input transitions. Click here for more information.

 

32 Channel Output Card The 32 Channel Output Card provides thirty-two 3.3 Volt binary outputs. The inputs are on pin 1 of a 3-pin header. The voltages at pins 2 and 3 are user selectable via screw terminals. Linux support includes both TCP and command line control of the card. Click here for more information.

 

Accessories

25 Amp Power Distribution Card : The PD25 Power Distribution Card provides an easy way to control power for your robot or automation. It can handle up to 25 Amps at 48 volts and has an automotive style fuse for over-current protection. There is a 5.5 mm barrel connector to attach your battery charger and the card has a remote-on connector if you want to control the power from another switch or a real-time-clock card. Click here for more information.

 

15 Amp Power Distribution Card : The PD15 Power Distribution Card provides an easy way to control power for your smaller robot or automation. It can handle up to 15 Amps at 48 volts and has an automotive style fuse for over-current protection. There is a 5.5 mm barrel connector to attach your battery charger and the card has a remote-on connector if you want to control the power from another switch or a real-time-clock card. Click here for more information.

 

5 Volt, 3 Amp Switching Regulator : The 5 Volt Switch-Mode Regulator (SMR5) offers a 5 Volt output with 3 Amps of continuous current (4 Amps peak). It has low ripple, reverse polarity protection, and high efficiency. Click here for more information.

 

ATX Power Break-Out Card : Use a surplus ATX power supply in your project by using the ATXPD break-out card to make the voltages on the ATX supply accessible. The ATXPD takes in power from the 20-pin/4-pin ATX power connectors and distributes them out to easy to use screw terminals. There is an on/off switch and a connector if you want to make the on/off remote use a real-time clock card for timed on/off. Click here for more information.

 

Molex Power Break-Out Card : Convert a spare Molex drive connector into a 12 and 5 volt supply using the DDPD drive break-out card. Easy to use screw terminals make connecting to the DDPD a snap. Click here for more information.

 

MP43 Aluminum Mounting Plate: The MP43 makes building a robot easier by eliminating the tedium of drilling mounting holes for Demand Peripherals cards. A top set of holes can hold up to twelve cards in a four-by-three arrangement and a second set of holes on the bottom lets you mount another nine cards on the bottom of the place. Cut-outs make it easy to route cables from top to bottom. The card is available in unfinished aluminum or sanded and painted with white primer. Click here for more information.

WW2 Prototyping Card : The WW2 Prototyping Card is great for building custom hardware to connect to the BaseBoard4. The card has 632 plated through holes and is ideal for most prototyping needs. Click here for more information.

WW1 Small Prototyping Card : The WW1 Prototyping Card is great for building custom hardware to connect to the BaseBoard4. The card has 308 plated through holes and is perfect for small circuits. Click here for more information.

 

CARD DIMENSIONS:

The Baseboard4 card is 3.8 inches by 3.8 inches. The four mounting holes are on 3.5 inch centers. Mounting holes have an inner diameter of 0.125 inches. The engineers at Demand Peripherals refer to this as a "full" size card.

A "half" size card divides a full size card into two while keeping the 3.5 inch mounting hole spacing on the long dimension. A gap of 0.050 inches is left between the cards. This gives the short edge of a half card a length of 1.875 inches and hole spacing of 1.575 inches. between the

Quarter size cards are 1.975 inches square with 0.125 inch mounting holes on 1.575 inch centers. Most cards have one mounting hole connected to ground. You can use this to connect the card to chassis ground if you wish. The 8-pin shrouded connector for the cable going to the FPGA card is offset from the edge of the card by about 0.050 inches. A notch is cut into the card near the connector to allow easier routing of cables under the cards.

 

CARD ELECTRICAL INTERFACE:

An FPGA can be programmed to implement several different peripherals simultaneously. Each peripheral is assigned a slot which defines the set of FPGA I/O pins dedicated to that peripheral. The photo to the right shows the location of the slots on the Baseboard4. For example, say you specified an FPGA image (DPCore.fpga) with a dual DC motor controller in Slot #2. This means that you should connect the Dual H-Bridge card to the pins marked S#2 in the photo.

Slot #1 always refers to the three buttons and eight LEDs on the Baseboard. Slot #10 refers to the three 3-pin headers on the Baseboard. These 3-pin headers can be used as GPIO lines or for three Ping))) (tm) ultrasonic distance sensors.

Note that the four connectors on the Baseboard4 are each split into two eight pin cables. Each of these 8-pin cables out to the interface cards has four FPGA lines, two ground lines, a 3.3 volt line, and a 5 volt line. The lines are arranged as follows:

The FPGA is not five volt tolerant. Applying more that 3.3 volts to the FPGA pins will damage the FPGA.

 

FPGA Defined Peripherals
User Interface
FPGA Configuration
FPGA Buttons & LEDs
Text LCD and Keypad
Quad WS2812 Interface
Quad Slide Pot
Tone Generator
IR Recv/Xmit
6 Digit LCD
RC Decoder
Keyfob RF Decoder
Rotary Encoder Interface
Motion Control
Dual DC Motor Controller
Dual Quadrature Decoder
Quad 13 Bit Servo
Bipolar Stepper Controller
Unipolar Stepper Controller
Simple Input / Output
Quad Binary Output
Quad Binary Input
Quad GPIO
Octal Input/Output
32 Channel Binary Output
32 Channel Binary Input
Sensors
Octal 12-bit ADC
Quad Ping))) Interface
Octal SRF04 Interface
Quad Event Counter
Instrumentation
Generic I2C
Generic SPI
Octal 8-Bit DAC
Quad Digital Potentiometer
Quad PWM Output
Quad PWM Input
4 Bit Pattern Generator
Real Time Clock
Dual Watchdog Timers
  

Interface Cards
User Interface
Audio Amplifier
IR Recv/xmit
Six Digit LCD Display
Keyfob RF Receiver
Rotary Encoder
Quad Switch Card
Text LCD / keypad
Quad Slide Pot
Motion Control
Dual 7-amp H-bridge
Quad Open Drain Driver
Quad 10 Amp Relay Card
Input / Output
Octal 8-Bit DAC
Quad Digital Potentiometer
Octal 12-bit ADC
9DOF IMU
Octal SRF04
Quad GPIO
Generic I2C
Generic SPI
USB 2.0 Hub
Real Time Clock
Slot Expander
Octal Input/Output
32 Channel Input
32 Channel Output
Accessories
Power Distribution Card
15 Amp Power Distribution
5 Volt Switching Regulator
ATX Power Break-Out Card
Disk Drive Power Break-Out
MP43 Aluminum Mounting Plate
WW2 Prototyping Card
WW1 Small Prototyping Card